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Professor Mark van Raamsdonk of the University of British Columbia gives the Stanford Physics and Applied Physics Colloquium on October 13, 2015.

The AdS/CFT correspondence from string theory provides a quantum theory of gravity in which spacetime and gravitational physics emerge from an ordinary non-gravitational system with many degrees of freedom. In this talk, I will explain how quantum entanglement between these degrees of freedom is crucial for the emergence of a classical spacetime, and describe progress in understanding how spacetime dynamics (gravitation) arises from the physics of quantum entanglement.
Jun 26 2015 |

Eva Silverstein gives a lecture on string theory at the International Centre for Theoretical Sciences.

Jun 18 2015 | Cosmology

Eva Silverstein of SITP gives a lecture at the 2015 TASI summer school on "New Frontiers in Fields and Strings" held at the Theoretical Advanced Study Institute, Jun 01-26, 2015.

Jun 15 2015 | Cosmology

Eva Silverstein of SITP gives a lecture at the 2015 TASI summer school on "New Frontiers in Fields and Strings" held at the Theoretical Advanced Study Institute, Jun 01-26, 2015.

Black holes have the remarkable property of irreversibility: if you fall into a black hole you can't get out (classically). This immediately suggested a connection with the other famous irreversibility in physics: the law of increase of entropy. Since the 70s, this connection between black holes and thermodynamic systems has been fleshed out in increasing detail and has lead to surprising conclusions. I will give an introduction to a recent body of work showing how black holes can in fact be used to shed light on exotic materials of interest in condensed matter physics, including the still-not-understood high temperature superconductors.

This is part 2 of a 2-part mini-lecture series given by Professor Sean Hartnoll from the Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics.

Black holes have the remarkable property of irreversibility: if you fall into a black hole you can't get out (classically). This immediately suggested a connection with the other famous irreversibility in physics: the law of increase of entropy. Since the 70s, this connection between black holes and thermodynamic systems has been fleshed out in increasing detail and has lead to surprising conclusions. I will give an introduction to a recent body of work showing how black holes can in fact be used to shed light on exotic materials of interest in condensed matter physics, including the still-not-understood high temperature superconductors.

This is part 1 of a 2-part mini-lecture series given by Professor Sean Hartnoll from the Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics.

Feb 23 2015 | Cosmology

Cosmological observations show that the universe is very uniform on the maximally large scale accessible to our telescopes.  The best theoretical explanation of this uniformity is provided by the inflationary theory.  Andrei Linde will briefly describe the status of this theory in view of recent observational data obtained by the Planck satellite.  Rather paradoxically, this theory predicts that on a very large scale, much greater than what we can see now, the world may look totally different.  Instead of being a single spherically symmetric balloon, our universe may look like a "multiverse,” a collection of many different exponentially large balloons ("universes") with different laws of low-energy physics operating in each of them.  The new cosmological paradigm, supported by developments in string theory, changes the standard views on the origin and the global structure of the universe and on our own place in the world.

UC Berkeley Physics Oppenheimer Lecture

 

ER = EPR is a shorthand that joins two ideas proposed by Einstein in 1935. One involved the paradox implied by what he called “spooky action at a distance” between quantum particles (the EPR paradox, named for its authors, Einstein, Boris Podolsky and Nathan Rosen). The other showed how two black holes could be connected through far reaches of space through “wormholes” (ER, for Einstein-Rosen bridges). At the time that Einstein put forth these ideas — and for most of the eight decades since — they were thought to be entirely unrelated.  But if ER = EPR is correct, the ideas aren’t disconnected — they’re two manifestations of the same thing. And this underlying connectedness would form the foundation of all space-time. Quantum entanglement — the action at a distance that so troubled Einstein — could be creating the “spatial connectivity” that “sews space together."  

(Source: Quanta Magazine)

This is part 2 of a 2-part mini-lecture series given by Professor Leonard Susskind, Director of the Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics.

ER = EPR is a shorthand that joins two ideas proposed by Einstein in 1935. One involved the paradox implied by what he called “spooky action at a distance” between quantum particles (the EPR paradox, named for its authors, Einstein, Boris Podolsky and Nathan Rosen). The other showed how two black holes could be connected through far reaches of space through “wormholes” (ER, for Einstein-Rosen bridges). At the time that Einstein put forth these ideas — and for most of the eight decades since — they were thought to be entirely unrelated.  But if ER = EPR is correct, the ideas aren’t disconnected — they’re two manifestations of the same thing. And this underlying connectedness would form the foundation of all space-time. Quantum entanglement — the action at a distance that so troubled Einstein — could be creating the “spatial connectivity” that “sews space together."  

(Source: Quanta Magazine)

This is part 1 of a 2-part mini-lecture series given by Professor Leonard Susskind, Director of the Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics.

This Strings 2014 talk by SITP Professor Shamit Kachru reviews recent developments in the study of moonshine.

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