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Quantum Gravity and Black Holes

Video Briefs

One of the most striking predictions of the general theory of relativity is the formation of black hole and cosmic horizons sequestering different regions of spacetime. In this talk we will overview recent theoretical and observational developments in this area.

Leonard Susskind's conversation with MIT Research Scientist Lex Fridman is part of Lex's Artificial Intelligence podcast series.
The 2018 Oskar Klein Memorial Lecture was given by Leonard Susskind in the Oskar Klein Auditorium, AlbaNova in Stockholm, Sweden on January 29, 2019.

Black hole and cosmological horizons -- from which nothing can escape according to classical gravity -- play a crucial role in physics. They are central to our understanding of the origin of structure in the universe, but also lead to fascinating and persistent theoretical puzzles. They have become accessible observationally to a remarkable degree, albeit indirectly. These lectures will start by introducing horizons and how they arise in classical gravity (Einstein's general relativity).

Professor Eva Silverstein of the Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics (SITP) discusses the physics of horizons, black holes, and string theory.

Professor Leonard Susskind describes how gravity and quantum information theory have come together to create a new way of thinking about physical systems. From fluid dynamics to strange metals, from black holes to the foundations of quantum mechanics, almost all areas of physics are being touched by the new paradigm.

Brian Swingle of the Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics discusses the latest research in Black Hole complexity and computational power at the 2015 SITP Templeton Conference.

Professor Mark van Raamsdonk of the University of British Columbia gives the Stanford Physics and Applied Physics Colloquium on October 13, 2015.

Black holes have the remarkable property of irreversibility: if you fall into a black hole you can't get out (classically). This immediately suggested a connection with the other famous irreversibility in physics: the law of increase of entropy. Since the 70s, this connection between black holes and thermodynamic systems has been fleshed out in increasing detail and has lead to surprising conclusions.

Black holes have the remarkable property of irreversibility: if you fall into a black hole you can't get out (classically). This immediately suggested a connection with the other famous irreversibility in physics: the law of increase of entropy. Since the 70s, this connection between black holes and thermodynamic systems has been fleshed out in increasing detail and has lead to surprising conclusions.

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